Saturday, February 21, 2015

Hampton Cove - Our New Office

Our new Pediatric Dentistry office opens in March 2015 to serve our patients in the Hampton Cove area.

Alabama Pediatric Dental Associates and Orthodontics (APDA) now has four offices: Huntsville, Decatur, Madison, and now Hampton Cove.  I can hardly believe that we have grown so much!  Our doctors plan to rotate to Hampton cove just as we do in our other offices.  We think you will like the nice, high end decor. Although, there is no huge indoor playground like in our larger offices, there is a great video game area for the kids.



Hampton Cove is a suburb of Huntsville, Alabama and for the most part resides within the city limits of Huntsville.  I remember when it was just cotton fields.  Now, there are many homes and a Trent Jones Golf Trail that is one of the best in the Southeast.

So, if your children need a Children's Dentist (teenagers too), give us a call.
Hampton Cove Office: 256-693-8900
I'll add some photos here as we begin the process.

The new sign:











37 comments:

Valerie said...

Congrats on your new location! We need more dental practices like yours, and I love the fact that you have an indoor playground...children will love that. Best of luck to you!

Lauren said...

Congratulations on your new office! It seems like you have some great activities that kids will enjoy. Thanks for sharing!

Jordan said...

Looks great! Hope the move to a new location goes well for you guys and brings in new patients!

Dentist in Hampton said...

Best wishes for Future & Congratulations on your new office!

Cabinet Stomatologic said...

Beautiful location, congratulations on your new office!

Antonio Montgomery said...

Hello I came across you web site and tired to post on your older blogs but was unable to. Any way I have a question. M son was found to have bad caries and four upper front teeth(. Yes bottle at night but off for few months now) dentist recommend pull front two filling on one and root canal on last tooth. Reason for removal is early root resorption. I asked to try root canal instead and if does not take then pull in 3-6 mo she said no. Am I being unreason? Is it that big of a risk. Oh my son is two and the offer of a pedipartial is not too appealing.

Antonio Montgomery said...

Hello my 2 yr old has ECC of four front teeth dentist recommended extract front two , one root canal and one filling. When asked why not three rout canal answer was early root resorption on xray. Is this a absolute contraindication or is there a gray area. Also can a pedipartial damage the good teeth?

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Most of the time root canals do not work predictably in baby tooth. Pulpotomies do, but not full on root canals. If there is root resorption, there really is no canal to fill. Sometimes the decay, and later on the effects of decay--dental abscess, infection and destruction of bone and root structure, means the best solution os removal--they simply are not savable. It is not unreasonable to ask, but if your pediatric dentist recommends removal, that is very likely the best choice.

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Oh, a pediatric partial is not necessary for space maintenance, chewing, speech, or anything else. It is usually for appearance only. It does not damage other teeth unless it reduces the ability to brush and clean them properly.

Antonio Montgomery said...

Okay that sound reasonable. One last question. If his teeth are removed and we desire temporary reconstruction for appearance are the pedipartials our only option.

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Pretty much....

A fixed partial is usually done. In teenagers, a removable partial (like a retainer) is sometimes used for a missing permanent tooth, as an interim till orthodontics and growth is completed. Removable appliances are not likely to be managed well by a preschooler.

The other alternative (not to be flippant) but, wait a couple years, till age 6 or 7, and new teeth will appear (erupt).

Carolyn said...

Fantastic. All the best in your future endeavours at your new premise

eugen said...

Very good work! Well done on your new area! We require more dental practices like yours.

gena stafford said...

My son has crowns on 7 of his molars. A few weeks ago while playing with dad he got a cut in his gum from dads nail. It was above a crowned tooth. I took him to the dentist and they said he was fine. Although I felt the dentist was pretty aggressive when checking his tooth. He said he wanted to make sure crown wasn't loose. Now a few weeks later I can see where the crown ends. It is no longer under the gum line. What should I do? I'm a very worried mom!

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Gena, from what you have described, it does not sound so bad. Sometimes, crown margins end above the gum line and that does not mean anything particular. I'd followup with your pediatric dentist if things seem strange. When new teeth erupt, the gum is like a do over....

gena stafford said...

I never could see where the crown ended before. Now that it is exposed could that mean the crown has become loose? Id like to note that I often observe his teeth since the crowns were placed. The tooth was not exposed a few weeks ago. I appreciate your feed back. I've had a hard time finding a dentist I've been completely comfortable with, this whole experience had been very trying for me. It's been a year and a half and I know there's many more to go....

Beth said...

The new location looks fantastic. Definitely an inviting place for children, especially with the indoor playground. I hope it brings you great business and success.

Diana Smith said...


Hello my name is Diana I have a 15 month old daughter. I am wondering if you can help me figure out what my daughter may have. Her teeth erupted fine but last month they started to get chalky and pretty much eroded. She lost the enamel on her top 4 teeth and has some signs on her molars. Could it be Hypominirealization? And an acidic environment that caused them to chip off the enamel so rapidly? I have had one dentist tell me its decay while two other told me its some sort of enamel defect. I can email you a photo. Any insight would be greatly appreacited!

image1.JPG

-Diana Smith

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Well, I don't know but sounds like either way, restorations or some kind of treatment is warranted. Often, decalcification (decay) in young kids is seen in the upper front teeth and the back molars.

acalderon523 said...

First of all, congrats! The new place looks amazing! I really hope you can help me with a couple of questions I have if you're not too busy. I have a two year old and I noticed he has a hole in his lateral incisor and on one of his central incisors (I hope I got those terms correct). I have made an appointment for him and its this week but I having a lot of anxiety. Will his dentist have to put silver caps on his teeth? When do kids have to get silver caps? Or will the dentist just have to do a filling for him? My son was born with sensitive teeth, when his two bottom teeth first came in they were yellowish and somehow whitened up as he got older, so strange. His upper teeth have yellow stains from when they first came in and those are still there just not as yellow, they lightened up. Anywho, I'm worried about the small holes he has now...please respond when you try a chance!! Thank you so much for your time!

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

As you can find many places on the blog, small cavities can be restores with small white fillings, silver (stainless steel) crowns ore often used int he back teeth if there are very large/deep cavities. There are a few options for white tooth colored crowns in the front teeth if needed, it mainly depends on the extent of the decay.

jyoti said...

Is a crown always needed after rct?

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

jyoti, Most of the time.

Anonymous said...

My daughter (5 yrs and 9 months old) has radiolucent areas right under 3 of her primary mandibular molars (in the space between the roots, right under the tooth proper) and her dentist plans to extract them. However, she doesn't think spacers are needed. You can see a formed permanent 1st molar right behind the primary molars underneath the gum surface. Would you agree that spacers are indeed not needed, especially if she plans to remove both right mandibular molars along with one left mandibular molar? Thank you!

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

I can't say specifically. All these things are multi factorial as to what to do. Most of the time removal of primary molars necessitates space maintenance for a 5 year old. See my posts on space maintainers for more info.

Thelma P. T. said...

Dear Dr. Brandon,

I just want to congratulate you for the simple but yet comprehensive way you explain things, so that whether being a colleague or a patient, you can still gain important and helpful knowledge from your articles!

-I am a general dentist my self, and I found your page while searching for some information.-

Anonymous said...

Hello Dr. Brandon.
My 17 year old daughter is congenitally missing her bottom 2nd molar on bottom left/right side. Her orthodontist here in Texas has never come across anything like this. I asked her general dentist who said to speak with her ortho. I began searching on internet for information and that is how I found your blog.
According to xrays (Oct 2014 and May 2016), my daughter shows no signs of ever getting her wisdom teeth or her 2nd molars. With that said, does she NEED implants or can she do without it? I am concerned because I have a long history in my family of the body rejecting implants (even ceramic).

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

I see missing permanent teeth all the time. I mean every day. Yes, the second molar is slightly less common to have missing, but it does happen. The treatment depends on the specific situation, measurements, etc. The orthodontist usually coordinates movement of the teeth, scheduling prosthetic teeth (implants) or the like which a general dentist usually completes (the implants or bridges. Sometimes, you just leave it, with no real consequences. Consult with your orthodontist and dentist. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

I have 2 sons and both of them have bottle rotted teeth and their teeth look like it's been worn down to almost nothing at the top will the little bit that's left fall out or do the dentist have to do surgery to pull them out?

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Teeth which have decayed down to the gum, are almost always non-restorable. Therefore, they are usually removed to prevent complications and infection.

Anonymous said...

Hi, my 8 year old daughter has 6 cavities. Her usual dentist wanted to fill 2 at a time during 3 separate sessions, so I would have to make 3 appts . I inquired at another dentist office which was highly recommended and they said that they can take care of all 6 cavities but they would sedate her and I could be in the room as long as I let the dentist be a dentist . I have been reading lots of stories about children of all ages dying after sedation or getting into some sort of coma . Is it better to make the 3 appts or is sedation safe when administered with the proper dosage ? Thank you so much .

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Each child and each case is different. We do both ways almost every day. Discuss the situation with your pediatric dentist (I do recommend a pediatric dentist specialist).

Anonymous said...

Hi my 3 year old has 8 cavities 4 at top and 2 top 1st molar and 2 bottom 1st molar she is in no pain but I
Have been told by the dentist that they need to be extracted
I didn't know whether to wait and see if she gets any signs of pain so I can keep her with teeth for a longer
Period as I'm worried that it might effect her speech or eating plz recommend what I should do

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Why wait till there is pain? My recommendation is to see a pediatric dentist, and do what you can to get recommended treatment completed. Things almost always get worse with time.

Anonymous said...

Txs for getting back to me, ther pediatric dentisit has just recommended extraction I thought maybe they could have put a crown on the
Back molars but they won't do that as there need to be health reason for them to do that in the uk.
Do u think she will be able to eat with remaining teeth not that I have any other choices txs

Dr. Dean Brandon said...

Read more here on the blog about all this in detail, but if a baby molar is restorable, I recommend restoring it (unless it is about to naturally fall out very soon and is causing no discomfort or other problems). If it's a large cavity, a crown may be indicated, or even a pulpotomy. If there is just too much tooth structure lost due to decay, even a crown will not work (there will not be enough health tooth left after the decay is removed).
Kids can eat pretty well with just a few (healthy) teeth. I have seen kids who have lots of decay, abscessed teeth, etc, begin to eat better and gain weight after we fix all the teeth--especially preschoolers with severe early childhood caries.
I don't now the guidelines/rules int he UK, but bacterial infection of a tooth (tn other words decay) is a health need- in many many ways. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

Txs for ur help much appreciated